Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Answers to copier buying questions’

A Little Know Secret to Saving Big Money on Your Next Copier Purchase or Lease

business man holding money

With today’s business climate being so uncertain many business owners and executives have become highly price sensitive when it comes to making purchases for their company.

I’ve been in sales and marketing for over 20 years in the Baltimore, Maryland and Washington DC Meto area during that time I’ve observed the level of price awareness rise each year.

I think I can safely assume that the same is true all over the United States and even overseas.

I can remember a time in the early 2000’s when a purchase of a few thousand dollars could be made relatively quickly, in 1 meeting, by a single decision maker who sometimes didn’t even get more than one quote from prospective vendors.

Now, that same purchase of a few thousand dollars requires multiple decision makers, several meetings and multiple price quotes from different competing vendors.

Obviously, things have changed.

//pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/js/adsbygoogle.js

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

Business owners and executives are looking at business expenditures, especially larger ones, much more closely due to the economic pressure we all feel.

One of the larger single expenditures for most companies is the purchase or leasing of copying and printing equipment.

Although many companies have initiatives to reduce paper, businesses in America still spend considerable amounts of money for the ability to copy and print documents.

If there was a way to reduce that cost you’d probably want to know about it right? Well there is!

If your organization never or rarely prints or copies 11″ x 17″ (ledger)  paper I have good news for you.

In the copier/multi-function printer world there is a way of classifying these machines.

The distinction is made by how large of  a sheet of paper the machine can print or copy on.

There are 2 classes and they go by the names A3 and A4. I won’t get into why they are named this way in this post but just know that there are 2 major classes.

To keep it simple an A3 machine can print and copy on to 11″ x 17″ (ledger) paper. In some cases they can even print up to 12″ x 48″ banners.

An A4 copier/multi-function printer is limited to printing letter (8 1/2″ x 11″) sized paper and legal (8 1/2 ” x 14″ ) sized documents.

As you may have guessed an A4 machine costs less because it doesn’t contain the components that are needed to print larger pieces of paper.

Years ago an A4 machines were typically only printers, usually desktop style, and A3 machines were copiers.

Over the last 5 or so years there has been a trend among copier and printer manufacturers where they have begun adding copying, scanning and faxing capabilities to their A4 model printers.

The result is a multi-function printer that does everything print,, copy, scan & fax) an A3 device does but for significantly less cost.

So if you are in the market for a new multi-function printer and don’t need to prints 11″ x 17″ documents ask your copier vendor and a few others to quote you on an A4 device as well so you can compare the two.

If your organization does occasionally need to print ledger sized documents keep in mind that you can always outsource that printing to a local printer who will happily take care of it for you.

So now I’m going to board up the doors and windows of my house because I’m sure I just ticked off a lot of copier sales guys by telling you this information.

Basically they’re going to make less money because of me.

Hopefully upon further reflection they’ll realize that although they are going to make less money they have most likely created a long term customer who is grateful  (and therefore more loyal) that the rep told them the truth even though it cost him or her commission dollars.

One last point.

Some people in my industry may make the point that an A4 machine cannot handle large copy and print volumes like an A3 can.

I don’t believe there is much validity to this point unless you are truly copying and printing large volumes of paper per month.

Even in that case, these machines are very reliable.

My best advice is to check the manufactures specifications for the device your considering use that as your guide.

I hope this helps.

As always, if you have any questions feel free to email me or simply give me a call.

If you’re in the market for a new copier, printer, document management software or IT services and you’re located in Baltimore, Maryland, Washington DC or Northern Virginia please allow me to provide you with a quote.

If you’re not in one of those areas and need quote please contact me anyway. I have a network of qualified, screened copier dealership in all 50 states, Australia, Canada and South Africa.

Thanks and have a fun day!!

443-570-0414 (cell)  edworthington@outlook.com

 

Have a fun day!!


Ed

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

How to Prevent Copier Jams: Part 1

Cancel Copier Lease

Summertime is here and you know what that means!!!

Warm days, an awesome new tan, hanging out at the beach or pool with friends and best of all….copier jams.

OK maybe copier jams aren’t fun and for some of you copier jams may be a huge cause of frustration during your work day. Have you ever noticed that you have more copier jams (also know as copier misfeeds) in the summer months than in at other times during the year?

The main reason for this may be the way that you store your copier paper. In the summer time humidity, especially here in Baltimore, Maryland where I’m located, can be very high.

If your copier paper is stored in a place that is susceptible to humidity like a closet or warehouse space than this may very well be the reason you’re having jams.

The fibers of the copier paper absorb the humidity (water) from the air and the paper becomes a bit more slippery. The way that copiers feed paper through the machine is with small rollers. If the paper becomes moist and slippery the rollers can slip thus causing a jam.

The other problem with moist paper is that it can start to curl at the edges. This will also cause jams. So when storing your copier paper keep it stored in a dry place and keep it off the ground if at all possible.

Place it on a shelf or even on top of some type of pallet. If you’re having trouble finding a dry spot in your office consider buying a small dehumidifier and placing it in the same room where you’ll be storing the paper. I’ll have more tips on how to prevent copier jams coming so subscribe to the blog and come back often.

If you have a copier related question please submit it in the easy form below and I’ll answer your question and maybe write a post on the topic.

If you’re in the Baltimore/DC Metropolitan area and are considering purchasing a new copier, printer, scanner. shredder, postage or mailing equipment please let me know. I’ll provide you with a fair, no BS proposal from our line of quality products from Xerox, Konica-Minolta, Lexmark and HP.

You can reach me at 443-570-0414 or edworthington@outlook.com

Have a great and FUN summer!!

Should You Include Copier Maintenance Plan Costs into Your Copier Lease? Updated

copier : young worker using a copy machine

Back in March of 2014 I wrote a post titled, Should You Include Copier Maintenance Plan Costs in Your Copier Lease?.

At the time I was very against including copier maintenance plan costs (also referred to as a copier service plan) into the lease of the copier.

I noted that in many cases the reason the copier buyer does this is for the convenience of having to write only one check while some copier companies may be motivated by the fact that they can get interest and fees on the maintenance plan costs whereas if the maintenance plan is billed separately they don’t.

Please note that I said “some” copier companies may be motivated by interest and fees on the service plan. I don’t want to paint the whole industry with a broad brush. That really wouldn’t be fair.

While I still feel that it’s generally a bad idea to add the service cost to the lease I have discovered a new way to go about this.

A way that you can combine the lease and the service agreement together without paying ANY interest or fees of any kind on the service. The best of both worlds.

It’s called a pass-through. The reason it’s called a pass-through is that the leasing company will accept their monthly payment from the business who leased the copier and then  pass the copier service/copier maintenance agreement portion of the payment back to the local copier company who sold the machine and performs the service/maintenance on the machine.

This is done without you the customer paying any fees whatsoever to the leasing company for passing the payment to the local copier company.

This can be a little confusing so I’ll sum up the whole process for you.

When you lease your new copier you purchase a service agreement on the copier.

A copier service agreement covers toner, repairs (including parts and labor) and preventative maintenance. All you have to do is buy paper. Everything else is covered.

When is comes to billing some copier companies will add the service/maintenance costs to the lease. The problem with this is that you are paying interest and fees on the service plan.

It doesn’t have to happen this way because the copier company who sold you the copier and will service the copier can bill you separately for the copier service agreement.

In other words you pay the leasing company their payment for the copier and write a separate check to the local copier company for the service plan on the copier because they will be performing the service on your copier.

Many copier buyers love the convenience of making only one payment but don’t want to pay interest and fees on the service plan if they don’t have to.

This is where the pass-through comes in.

The leasing company sends the customer one monthly bill which includes the copier and the service agreement and then passes the service plan portion of the payment back to the local copier company.

The copier buyer is happy because they only had to cut one check.

It’s a great service that provides the best of both worlds for the copier buyer.

I now offer this single payment service to my customers here at my copier company in Baltimore so if you are in Maryland, DC, Northern Virginia or Delaware and would like a competitive quote from a copier salesperson who will tell you the truth (even when it hurts), please fill out the quick easy form below and I would be glad to help.

If you are anywhere else in the United States and would like my recommendation for honest copier companies in your local area fill out the form below and I’ll get back to you with the names of some trusted companies.

As always feel free to ask me any copier buying question and I’ll do my best to give you a solid answer.

Thanks for stopping by. Have fun.

Ed Worthington

 

 

 

 

 

How Small Businesses Can Save BIG Money on Copying & Printing Costs

Last week I received a call from a small professional services company located in Bethesda, Maryland. The bottom line of the call was that this company was struggling with declining revenues since 2008 due to the economic downturn and is looking to save money on their copying and printing costs.

My experience in the field tells me that they’re not alone. I seem to be getting more and more calls and emails from small business owners and executives with the same questions and concerns. The owners of these small businesses are feeling uncertain about the future and looking to save money wherever they can.

As a matter of fact, this company wasn’t just looking to save money, they needed to save money to stay in business.

They wanted to know if I could help. I could, and in a BIG way. I’ll explain how I did it in a moment but first here is some important background information.

There are approximately 28 million small businesses (under 500 employees) in America . Approximately 90% of these companies have 20 or less employees and about 96% have 50 employees or less. Chances are pretty good that if you’re reading this you’re one of them.

The bottom line is that there are a lot of  small businesses in America and many of them are unknowingly throwing money away every day by using very inefficient and expensive desktop printers and all-in-one (print,copy, scan, fax) desktop printers. I’m not talking about a few dollars here.  There is much more than that in play here.

I’ve been told by more than one business owner that they’ve always assumed because they have so few employees and do such a small amount of printing and copying that it wouldn’t be cost effective for them to purchase or lease a stand alone copier. That assumption is costing many of them thousands of dollars per year.

When I say thousands I mean that literally. No exaggeration. If that sounds like a lot of money that’s because it is. Especially for a small business.

Many businesses based on the assumptions I listed above go to Staples, Office Depot or go online and purchase multiple desktop printers and/or desktop all-in-one printers.

Although these desktop models are less expensive than a stand alone copier to purchase up front, in the long run they can be considerably more expensive to operate due to the high cost of their consumables such as toner, drums, ect.

It’s important to take a close look at the total cost of ownership of your current copying & printing equipment.

I designed The Copier Cost Comparison Worksheet to give businesses and professional practices like yours a way to assess the monthly cost of your current copier(s)/printer(s) to the cost to the cost of the solution that a prospective vendor is offering.

This worksheet is especially helpful for businesses that are using multiple desktop all-in-one machine like the popular Brother or HP models.

There are many variables that effect the overall costs of copiers and printers so you may have questions about your specific situation. When these questions arise feel free to call me directly or fill out the easy contact form at the bottom of this post.

1) How much do you spend on toner per month for all existing machines? Include all desktop printers and all-in-one printers.

__________

2) How much do you spend per year over the last several years replacing  fax machines, desktop printers and all-in-one devices?  (Divide annual amount by 12)

__________

3) Total Monthly Cost of Existing Copier/Document Management Process (Add lines 1 and 2)

__________

4) Proposed Monthly Investment for Stand Alone Copier (Lease Payment or Purchase Amount Divided by 60 Months)

__________

5) Proposed Monthly Investment for Service Plan on Stand Alone Copier

__________

6) New Monthly Investment for Stand Alone Copier (Add lines 4 and  5)

__________

7) Savings Per Month with Proposed Stand Alone Copier Solution (Subtract line 6 from line 3)

__________

8) Annual Savings with Proposed Stand Alone Copier Solution (Multiply line 7 by 12 months)

__________

9) Savings Over Full Lease Term with Proposed Stand Alone Copier Solution (Multiply line 7  by number of  months of lease term)

__________

Other Considerations:

In addition to the savings shown above, your office staff will now be much more efficient in their daily work. The time invested in repeated workflow processes will be dramatically reduced due to the unique features of a stand alone copier solution. There is a definite savings in cost of man hours due to this increase in office efficiency.

Additionally, if you currently receive a high volume of inbound faxes you can save additional revenues by using the stand alone copier as a fax machine. Each fax printed on a stand alone copier is far less expensive than that of a fax machine.

Also with a stand alone copier you don’t have to print every fax. You can have the faxes routed to an email inbox as a pdf document. Many businesses receive several pages of fax spam per day. You no longer have to pay for toner and paper to print out these advertisements. Just view and delete them right from the an email inbox.

These savings are in addition to the savings on this worksheet.

If your organization is located in the Baltimore, Washington DC, Northern Virginia metro area I’d be happy to perform a cost analysis to see if I can save you money. Chance are good that I can whether you have desktop equipment or stand alone copiers.

It never hurts to get a competitive quote to compare your current vendor to.

If you have any questions feel free to call me or fill out the easy contact form below. Have Fun!

Ed Worthington 443-570-0414

What Happens at the End of a Copier Lease? If You Don’t Know, You’ll Pay Too Much

In my day to day work one of the most frequently asked questions I get about copiers is, “what happens at the end of the lease?”.

I have covered this in a previous post on the general topic of leases but I thought it might be good to dedicate a specific post to the topic.

What happens at the end of a copier lease depends on what type of lease it is, fair market value or dollar out/ buck out lease.

At the end of a fair market value lease the leasing company will decide what they believe the fair market value of your copier is based on the original sale price.

If you would like to keep the copier you just pay the leasing company that amount of money and it’s yours.

If you don’t want to pay what the leasing company is asking than you let the leasing company know that and they will send you return instructions via fax or email.

The return instructions will let you know how to ship the copy machine and where to ship copy machine to get it back to them.

The “where” is self explanatory but the how requires you pay special attention to what the leasing company is asking you to do.

For example, how they want the copier packed and how much and what type of shipping  insurance they require you to put on the copier.

Also they will let you know by what date they expect you to have the machine at their location.

Doing exactly as the leasing company has asked is very important.

I have a customer in Westminster, Maryland who recently bought a copier from me.

When he decided to purchase his next copier from me his current vendor told him they would come get the copier and ship it back to the leasing company at no charge.

RED FLAG!! Why would they do that at their cost for a customer who has just decided to go with another copier company.

I instructed my customer to be sure he asks his former vendor for proof of insurance on the shipping as well as proof that they had shipped it.

Unfortunately my new customer didn’t follow my advice and somehow the copier never made it back to the leasing company. Well guess who’s liable for the $2,000 value of that copier. My customer is.

To further complicate the matter his former vendor had just been purchased by another copier company in Baltimore and when he called them they referred him to the new copier company saying that the new company has all of their customer records.

Well when he contacted the new copier company in Baltimore they had no record whatsoever of this customer.

The moral of the story is at the end of a fair market value lease if you decide not to keep the copy machine be sure to control the process of shipping that machine back and do exactly as the leasing company has asked or you can end up like my new customer who now owes the leasing company $2,000 and he no recourse.

Now let’s move on to dollar buyout or sometimes referred to buck-out leases.

This type of lease is simple. At the end of the lease you pay the leasing company one dollar and the copier is yours to keep. Thus the name dollar out copier lease or buck out copier lease.

I hope this helps. If you have any questions feel free to contact me using the form below or by email. ed@edworthington.com.

Thanks for stopping by. Have a fun day.

Which Copier Should I Buy?

November 13, 2012 Leave a comment

Which copier should I buy?

It’s a question I get from my customers as well as my friends who are in the business world.

The many different vendors,copy machines, accessories and service plans can make your head spin.

I’m here to help.

Take a look at my Copier Comparison Guide. It will help you compare different vendor proposals in order to get the best deal for your business.

Perhaps most importantly it will empower you by teaching you the questions you should be asking each vendor in order to get the best deal.

When a prospective vendor hears you ask these types of questions they’ll know that they’re dealing with someone who knows more than the average person about copiers.

This will significantly decrease the chance of them trying to get over on you.

My advice, print this guide, contact the top 3 copier companies in your area and compare.

Please call or email  me with any questions. Hope this helps.

Ed Worthington  *443-570- 0414  *ed@edworthington.com

https://www.box.net/s/txmhoehkwnghfk7mce25

How Fast Does My Copier Really Need To Be?

November 11, 2012 Leave a comment

One of the questions I get the most and probably the first question you should ask yourself when purchasing a copier is, “how fast does my copier need to be?”.

The speed of the copier you select should be based on the number of copies and prints you will do per month.

Buyer Beware! When reading the manufactures literature they tend to overinflate the number of pages per month that their copiers can handle.

So in order to help with this question I have copied the information below ( how to determine your monthly output and the maximum duty chart) from BLI’s (Buyers Laboratory) website.

BLI is an excellent source of unbiased information for anyone in the process of buying a copier or printer. At the end of this post I have included information on who Buyers Lab is and how to contact them.

How do you determine your monthly output volume?

  • Bills for your service agreement and print shop provide a good snapshot of your current usage; so does a look at your current copier’s meter.
  • Some copier companies use network management utilities that can tell you all the prints, copies, faxes and/or scans sent from the network to your copier or printer.
  • Many dealers also use devices that audit your volume. However, audit tools can sometimes miss devices such as small printers.

The chart below compares the average manufacturers maximum monthly page output vs. what Buyers Lab recommends so you don’t  send your copier to an early grave.

Manufacturers’ Maximum Monthly Duty Cycle vs. BLI’s Optimum Monthly Volume

Monochrome Average Maximum Monthly Duty Cycle BLI’s Optimum Monthly Volume
Up to 20 ppm 19,094 3,600
21 to 30 ppm 50,983 9,000
31 to 40 ppm 123,140 17,000
41 to 49 ppm 145,141 26,500
50 to 59 ppm 259,070 37,250
60 to 69 ppm 314,865 55,000
70 to 79 ppm 347,059 82,000
80 to 89 ppm 530,000 135,000
90 to 99 ppm 750,000 175,000
Color* Average Maximum Monthly Duty Cycle BLI’s Optimum Monthly Volume
16 to 25 ppm 85,879 13,500
26 to 36 ppm 113,101 15,000
37 to 46 ppm 153,278 28,000
46+ ppm 225,306 36,500

* For color models that a have a different speed for color and black modes, the speeds listed are the black speeds.

Hope this helps!

Come back next month when I’ll cover the question, “Should I lease or buy a copier?”.

If you have any copier buying questions please feel free to contact me.

If your business is located in Baltimore, Maryland,  Washington, DC or Northern Virgina and you are in the market for a new or used copier please contact me for a NO OBLIGATION, ABSOLUTELY NO PRESSURE quote.

Ed Worthington- Senior Account Executive

Action Business Systems-Toshiba

ed@edworthington.com

443-570-0414

Buyer Lab Info:

For over 45 years, Buyers Laboratory (BLI) has been the leading source for unbiased and reliable intelligence for the imaging industry. BLI was founded in 1961 by the late Arthur Kallet, the co-founder and 20-year head of Consumers Union, the publisher of the highly respected Consumer Reports magazine (BLI is not affiliated with Consumers Union). In February 2004, BLI was acquired by publishing industry veterans Michael Danziger and Mark Lerch, the current Chief Executive Officer and Chief Operating Officer of BLI, respectively. In 2005, BLI launched its international division with offices in Hong Kong and London.

You can reach Buyer Lab on the web at http://www.buyerslab.com